Introduction

The University of Bradford has established a reputation for work on imaging and visualisation in archaeology and anthropology through a number of high-profile projects. These capabilities are built around expertise in 3d imaging of bones, artefacts, archaeological sites, heritage structures and landscapes. We undertake research and commercial work with institutions that want to make their collections more widely accessible; as well as archaeologists and heritage bodies that are interested in digital documentation of bones, artefacts, standing buildings and archaeological sites.

Capabilities

Projects

Jisc Rapid Digitisation Project awarded £93,199 – this project led by Dr Andrew Wilson (with Dr Jo Buckberry, Dr Chris Gaffney and Prof Hassan Ugail) served as a pilot study for Digitised Diseases and concentrated on the collection of leprosy skeletons from the Medieval leprosarium of St Mary and St James in Chichester, curated in Bradford.
Jisc Mass Digitisation Project awarded £749,966 – this project led by Dr Andrew Wilson (with Dr Jo Buckberry, Dr Chris Gaffney and Professor Hassan Ugail) has produced 3d photo-realistic digital models of diseased bone reflecting chronic pathological conditions that affect the skeleton. More than 1600 specimens were digitised in Bradford and with our project partners - The Royal College of Surgeons & Museum of London Archaeology - using 3d laser scanning, ct and radiography.
AHRC Science & Heritage Programme RDA awarded £97,512 – this project led by Dr Andrew Wilson (with Dr Sonia O’Connor, Rob Janaway and Professor Hassan Ugail) is creating a web-based resource of digitised raw materials and worked artefacts that will help with the identification of animal hard tissues (e.g. ivory, horn, baleen) of benefit to many including heritage professionals and in the fight against wildlife crime.
AHRC Digital Transformations Programme Theme Large Grant awarded £1,979,850 – this major project led by Dr Randy Donahue (with Dr Andrew Wilson, Dr Adrian Evans and Dr Nicholas Ashton) will be working with new transformative digital recording methods and computed analysis to revolutionize 'refit analysis' for landscape, site, and artefact studies, practices that are traditionally labour intensive.